MENU
 

More Health and Nutrition Bites

Take-out vs. made-from-scratch: weighing and pricing the options 05/23/18
How NOT to do science: very low carbohydrate diets and Type 1 diabetes 05/16/18
Low energy density foods keep you satisfied (and may help you lose weight) 05/09/18
Fish also good for diabetics: confirming conventional wisdom 05/02/18
Putting calories and sodium information on restaurant menus may backfire 04/25/18
The next step in the fight against heart disease: teaching medical students how to cook 04/18/18
Omega-3 supplements may not guard against heart attack 04/11/18
Pasta still won't make you gain weight 04/04/18
Testing resveratrol and curcumin as anti-inflammatories 03/28/18
Should you consume additional protein to help maintain muscle mass? 03/21/18
It's the quality of the carbohydrates that counts 03/14/18
B vitamin supplements linked to lung cancer 03/07/18
Genetically-based weight loss plans 02/28/18
Eating more highly processed foods linked to greater risk of cancer 02/21/18
Can you be fit and fat? 02/14/18
'Burning hot' tea linked to esophageal cancer 02/07/18
All Health and Nutrition Bites

Related

Grapefruit Juice and Drug Interactions
Scientists have now identified the exact substance in grapefruit juice that interacts with various medications. Researchers at the University of North Carolina knew that furanocoumarins (a naturally-occurring substance found in grapefruit juice) had been found in laboratory tests to enhance the absorption of some medications, but lab tests are not the same as tests in human subjects.

Can I substitute Resveratrol for my Coumadin (warfarin)?
Resveratrol is one of the substances that is found in wine and grape juice. There is a feeling that this might be a chemical that contributes to the benefits of drinking these beverages. The molecule has been isolated and is being tested in all kinds of non-human subjects now. While some of that research is encouraging, there is only a single human research study that is even close to positive.

Are Lean Cuisine meals safe for Coumadin (warfarin) users?
It's difficult to say whether such pre-prepared meals are safe for those who use Coumadin® (warfarin) or not. We have asked....


 

Health & Nutrition Bites

Get the latest health and diet news - along with what you can do about it - sent to your Inbox once a week. Get Dr. Gourmet's Health and Nutrition Bites sent to you via email. Sign up now!

American Ginseng Can Reduce
the Effects of Coumadin (Warfarin)

Coumadin® (warfarin) is a prescription medication that is widely used to prevent blood from forming clots. It works by blocking the action of Vitamin K, which helps create the enzymes that coagulate blood. The anticoagulant effect of warfarin can be affected by many factors, including changes in the intake of Vitamin K or using substances that might affect the clotting enzymes.

Ginseng is felt by some to help with energy and vitality, especially during stress. Some feel it can improve memory and "brain power." There has been little solid evidence to support this, however. In a paper published in The Annals of Internal Medicine (2004; 141:23-27) Dr. Yuan and his study team had twenty patients take warfarin. In the first week the medication was given and the INR checked. In the second week, 12 of the participants began also taking American ginseng, while 8 began taking a placebo. Neither the participants or the researchers knew which patient was in which group during the study.

When the scientists looked at the data, they found that the group taking the ginseng had a lowered effectiveness of the warfarin. It doesn't appear that the ginseng has an effect on Vitamin K, however, and the researchers speculated that ginseng may affect enzymes in the liver directly. They do note that their study participants were younger than most people who are on anticoagulant medication. There is also a question of whether ginseng products other than the American variety act the same way.

What this means for you

This is another study that shows how important it is for patients using any prescription medication to consult their physician about all of the supplements that they are taking. This is especially true with medications that have high risk of side effects, like warfarin.

First posted: May 9, 2006