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The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan

Timothy S. Harlan, M.D. tells you what to eat and when in order to eat healthier, lose weight, and keep it off - permanently!

With The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan, you'll create a two-week custom meal plan including breakfast, lunch and dinner, for yourself or your entire family - even kids under 14! NO making separate meals. Online planner includes:

1. Automated shopping lists - Just print and shop for the next two weeks of meals.

2. Frozen meal options for lunch or dinner such as Lean Cuisine or Weight Watchers.

3. Easy, delicious recipes, with leftovers for lunches or later in the week.

4. Options for allergies and special diets, including:

  • Vegetarian (lacto-ovo)
  • Low sodium
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Coumadin (warfarin) use
  • GERD / Acid Reflux
  • Gluten allergies (Celiac disease).
  • Diabetes: All meal plans are safe for type 2 diabetics because they are based on the Mediterranean Diet, which is known to be the best diet for type 2 diabetics.

5. Combine special needs if needed: low sodium and lactose intolerant? Coumadin and celiac disease? Just select the options and get your delicious meal plan!

Other Web sites charge you as much as $29.95 per month for this service, but Just Tell Me What to Eat: The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan is completely free. (We don't even ask for your credit card information.)

Sign up for Just Tell Me What to Eat: The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan now! »


 

Low Cholesterol / Low-Fat Diets



Timothy S. Harlan, M.D.One of the great benefits of our understanding about the Mediterranean diet is that it put to rest the myth that a low-fat diet is beneficial.

The idea of a low-fat diet came about as the result of faulty science in the 1980s. There are a lot of reasons for this, and I do believe that researchers at the time were working from the best information they had available to them. This culminated in 1990 with the work of Dr. Dean Ornish and a report in The Lancet on his research known as The Lifestyle Heart Trial. This was a small study that followed two groups of patients with documented heart disease. The control group received the "usual care" and the study group a low-fat diet. The results showed a regression of heart disease in the study group and the food world changed overnight.

All of the sudden everything was about consuming a low-fat diet - to the exclusion of everything else. This idea prevailed throughout the 1990s with a tremendous amount of diet research focusing on the concept. As the research results came in, however, it became clear that a healthy diet isn't about low-fat at all. When larger studies were done it became clear that the amount of trans-fats in foods and their contribution to heart disease was the issue. At the same time researchers were discovering that it was not so much the amount of fat but the ratio of quality monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats to the amount of saturated fat.

Parallel to this research and supporting the conclusions were very large studies being performed in Mediterranean countries. About a dozen years after Dr. Ornish's work, the results were clear that a low-fat diet is not a good idea and may actually cause more harm than good. The target is around 35% to 40% of calories from fat (not 10%).

What changed was the explosion in good quality nutrition research over the last 20 years, but also people overlooked something important in Dr. Ornish's work. Not only was there instruction in a low-fat diet, but they were also instructed in a program to help the participants stop smoking, exercise and reduce stress. Because the study was so small, it's hard to know which of these may have had the most effect (although we know that all three are beneficial both by themselves and when combined with each other).

As a result of the confusion in the 1990s, the idea of low-fat diet often became confused with lowering cholesterol and there was for the longest time the idea that a low-cholesterol diet would actually lower one's serum cholesterol. This has been pretty much disproven now as well. While there are a small minority of people who will have their cholesterol profile affected by consuming a high cholesterol diet, for the majority of us consuming cholesterol in our diet simply doesn't matter.

The take home message here is that if you see a recipe or a product labeled "low-fat" or "low-cholesterol," be suspect. That's not to say that all reduced-fat products are bad, but choose wisely. Lower fat dairy products can be a good choice, but low-fat cookies or snack foods will usually have more calories than their "regular" versions.

Likewise, it's clear that there's no reason for you to be following a low-fat diet. Choosing the right fats is key.